Review: The Girl Without Skin by Mads Peder Nordbo

The Girl Without Skin (Grønland – Greenland #1) by Mads Peder Nordbo

They were near the edge of the glacier. The sea beneath the helicopter was dense with pack ice. In front of them, the endless whiteness stretched as far as the light could reach. It hurt his eyes. Millions of white crystals. Except in one place. One spot. Right where the mummified Norseman had been found and Aqqalu had kept watch. There, the ice was glossy red.

When a mummified Viking corpse is discovered in a crevasse out on the edge of an ice sheet, journalist Matthew Cave is sent to cover the story. The next day the mummy is gone, and the body of the policeman who was keeping watch is found naked and flayed—exactly like the victims in a gruesome series of murders that terrified the remote town of Nuuk in the 1970s.

As Matt investigates, he is shocked by the deprivation and brutal violence the locals take for granted. Unable to trust the police, he begins to suspect a cover-up. It’s only when he meets a young Inuit woman, Tupaarnaq, convicted of killing her parents and two small sisters, that Matt starts to realise how deep this story goes—and how much danger he is in.

Text Publishing |  1 October 2018  |  AUD$29.99

My Blurb (3/5 stars)

I’ve watched pretty much all the Nordic crime shows on Netflix which is one reason I’m interested in this book. The title itself, The Girl Without Skin, is intriguing despite the promised gruesomeness. But I’m still not quite sure how this title work… it’s definitely not a literal meaning.

The opening chapter captured my interest easily despite breaking heart. Matthew Cave lost all meaning to his life in one horrific accident. He fled and found himself in Nuuk (Greenland). When a mummified corpse was found, he expected it to be a worldwide breaking news but instead it set off a series of murders that are eerily similar to the one in 1970s.

About 70% of the book is told from Matthew’s perspective in the present time as he followed up clues to crack this mystery. The rest of the book is journal entries by a police officer in the 70s who investigated those murders but then disappeared, leaving this notebook behind. The root of the mystery though is not the murders themselves but something else that is dark and has never yet seen the light.

At roughly halfway through the book Matthew appeared to have gained a sidekick, Tupaarnaq. Though really, I reckon he’s the sidekick in this partnership; Tupaarnaq is one tough chick -hiding a world of hurt. I don’t know if anyone else sees this but she reminds me of Amanda Pharrell from Crimson Lake series (except for Amanda’s unique & quirky sense of humour).  I’d be more interested to hear her perspective.

I very much enjoyed the setting, atmosphere, & cultural differences I found in The Girl Without Skin but overall, I didn’t particularly found the mystery engaging. I wasn’t surprised by any twists and found myself disappointed by how easily the mysteries of Tupaarnaq’s past (um, yes, I Googled on how to pronounce that name!) & Matthew’s father’s disappearance were dismissed. I’d be interested in the sequel though as I’d like to see the development of this partnership.

Thanks to Text Publishing for copy of book in exchange of honest review.

About the author

Mads Peder Nordbo is Danish but has lived in Nuuk for several years. Born in 1970, he hold degrees in Literature, Communications and Philosophy from The University of Southern Denmark and the University of Stockholm. Mads has lived in Denmark, Sweden, Germany and Greenland. He works in communications at the Town Hall in Nuuk, where he amongst other things, writes for the mayor of the municipality, Kommuneqarfik Sermersooq, which stretches across the Greenland ice sheet. Mads Peder Nordbo is the author of three novels. THE GIRL WITHOUT SKIN is his debut as a crime writer.

Find Rebecca on:  website  |  goodreads  |  instagram  | facebook  | twitter

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Review: Archenemies by Marissa Meyer + a Giveaway

Archenemies (Renegades #2) by Marissa Meyer

Time is running out.
Together, they can save the world.
But they are each other’s worst nightmare.

Nova’s double life is about to get a lot more complicated:

As Insomnia, she is a full-fledged member of the Renegades, a syndicate of powerful and beloved superheroes. She works with Adrian’s patrol unit to protect the weak and maintain order in Gatlon City.

As Nightmare, she is an Anarchist – a member of a group of villains who are determined to destroy the Renegades. Nova wants vengeance against the so-called heroes who once failed her when she needed them most.

But as Nova, her feelings for Adrian are deepening, despite the fact that he is the son of her sworn enemies.

Nova, Adrian, and the rest of their crew are faced with escalating crime in Gatlon City, while covert weapons and conflicting missions have Nova and Adrian questioning not only their beliefs about justice, but also the feelings they have for one another.

The line between good and evil has been blurred, but what’s clear to them both is that too much power could mean the end of their city – and the world – as they know it.

Published 31 November 2018 |  Publisher: Pan Australia  |  RRP: AUD$18.99

My Blurb (3.5 / 5 stars)

Archenemies begins with a stake out by Renegades Sketch, Monarch, Red Assassin, Smokescreen, and Insomnia. It’s a pretty promising start that we got action right at the beginning. But then, I must confess that even if I found the book pretty easy to read, I don’t much remember what happened in the middle (did anything happen?!). The last 100 pages though near gave me palpitations! Heartpounding, action-packed with lots of near misses though it didn’t quite end with a cliffhanger (thank goodness!)

In Renegades, I really liked the dynamics of the friendship in this Renegades team but it was mostly missing in this book with a bit more pairings happening in this one. A lot of stuff between Adrian & Nova but the rest of the team was mostly missing especially Monarch. We know almost nothing about her, in fact, she seems to be most mysterious out of all of them.

Archenemies is full of anxiety. Adrian with his secrets he’s finding harder and harder to tell whilst Nova with her secrets she’s keeping a tight lid on. There were quite a bit of tip-toeing around which made the read a little bit exciting though it’s always a let down when nothing more happen. I do think that last 100 pages of the book is worth hanging on for so make sure you read to the end!

Thanks to Pan Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review. 

GIVEAWAY

Courtesy of Pan Macmillan Australia, 1 paperback copy of Archenemies is up for grabs! To enter, simple leave a comment with what book you are currently reading and include a random sentence/short paragraph from it. I will draw the winner on the evening of Friday, 30th November.

Please note this giveaway is limited to ANZ residents only.

About the author

Marissa Meyer is the #1 New York Times-bestselling author of Heartless and The Lunar Chronicles. She lives in Tacoma, Washington, with her husband and twin daughters. She’s a fan of most things geeky (Sailor Moon, Firefly, any occasion that requires a costume), and has been in love with fairy tales since she was a child. She may oay not be a cyborg.

Find Marissa on:  goodreads  |  website  | twitter  |  facebook  | instagram  |  pinterest

A.A. Kinsela: Q&A

Thank you, Alethea, for your time and for sharing a bit about yourself & your writing journey. I can’t wait to see what’s installed for Nick & his friends!

Quick Qs

Dark Chocolate or Milk Chocolate? Dark.

Coffee or Tea? Coffee for work and friends, tea for relaxation.

Dog-ear or whatever else as bookmark? Whatever is nearest. Usually a ticket or receipt.

Plot or Character? Ah damn this is a hard one! Can I say both? Character is paramount, but plot is essential as well. Character trumps plot though.

HEA or unexpected twist? I love an unexpected twist!

Q: Could you please share with us a little bit about yourself and how you became a writer? Was there a particular book you loved as a child or how did you love of words translate to writing?

A: I’ve always loved books and writing. I devoured books as a child and spent my teenage years reading while my peers were out socialising. I was also heavily into music, and when I finished school I wanted to be a film composer, so I went and studied music composition at uni. I realised after a year that I loved literature and writing more than music so I switched degrees. I’ve been a publisher, grammarian, psychology examiner, teacher, archaeologist, and more, but writing has always been the driving force in my life. I couldn’t imagine existing without it.

 

Q: In Lightning Tracks, you’ve brought the Roman Empire to Australia, mix in Aboriginal stories, and set it in this present time. You obviously love history and specifically Roman & Australia history? How did this come about and what in particular did you love about Roman & Australia histories?

A: I have always had a fascination with mythologies and cultural stories. My Bachelor of Arts majors were Literature and Classics, so as well as English Literature, I also studied Latin, Ancient Greek and classical literature. In Year 10, I did a week of work experience with an archaeologist and have always had a keen interest in archaeology as well, so much so that I went back to uni in 2010 to study archaeology. I’m particularly interested in Indigenous archaeology, and with my background in writing and teaching I wrote and published Ancient Australia Unearthed, a high school archaeology textbook, in 2014. Lightning Tracks does draw on mythologies from the ancient world, mainly Greece and Rome, and while it contains suggestions of other mythologies, none of them are taken from Aboriginal cultures. As an archaeologist and author, I’m very aware of the dangers of appropriation, so all the mythologies in Lightning Tracks are entirely my creation.

 

Q: I don’t know much of any Indigenous stories/legends so I’m not sure which part, if any, in Lightning Tracks, is actually part of the Australian Aboriginal story. Was there any? How much research did this involve? Are some of the names also derived from an Aboriginal dialect?

A: None of the legends in Lightning Tracks are Aboriginal stories. As a non-Indigenous Australian I have no right to tell these stories, nor can I appropriate them in any way, as they are copyrighted. The fictional legends in the novel may seem at times like Aboriginal stories, perhaps because mythologies are always representative of the people and environment in which they were created. The cultural groups in Lightning Tracks, whose ancestors arrived two thousand years ago and who are now very much grounded in the Australian landscape, have their own unique mythologies that have evolved over time to reflect this existence.

The research for Lightning Tracks was extensive, including visiting sites where parts of the novel are set, learning about different flora and fauna in the different climates and altitudes, ensuring the fictional world of Korelios reflected the archaeological record both in terms of its Roman/Greek roots and the current Australian archaeological record, and many other smaller details that are vital to world-building.

There are three main cultural groups in Lightning Tracks, all of them based loosely on real ancient cultures/regions: Roman/Greek, Persian/Middle Eastern, and North African. The character names for each group reflect their cultural origins. None of the names are Aboriginal.

 

Q: Please share top 3 things you’ve learnt in your journey of writing & publishing this particular book (Lightning Tracks); it could be something you learnt of yourself, about writing/publishing, a particular touching story from a research, etc.

A: I think the top of my learning curve list would have to be self-publishing. Lightning Tracks has come close on a couple of occasions to being accepted by traditional publishers, but never made it past the marketing department, perhaps because the novel crosses genres and doesn’t fit neatly into a single box. Deciding to self-publish was the next logical step. I’d already self-published an archaeology book, so I thought this one would be similar and easier. I can say unequivocally that self-publishing fiction is an entirely different arena to non-fiction!

Second would have to be the importance of accepting that a novel is finished. If I don’t set myself deadlines, I could work on a book for much longer than is necessary.

And third, it’s so thrilling to draw on many branches of knowledge and research and combine them to create something new. I thoroughly enjoy this aspect of writing.

 

Q: What are your top reads for 2018 to date? And which book are you desperately waiting for publication?

A: I’m currently reading Found by Fleur Ferris (I adore her work). I’ve ordered Ellie Marney’s Circus Hearts series (they haven’t arrived in the mail yet but I’m looking forward to reading these beauties), and I am always awaiting the next Patrick Ness.

Oooh, you’d love Circus Hearts! Ellie Marney is the BEST! I love Fleur Ferris too though not a big fan of Patrick Ness… just haven’t really got into his books, really. ~T

Q: What are you working on now? Or what can we look for from you next? I’m hoping it’s the sequel to Lightning Tracks! How many books can we expect in the series?

A: I’ve got a few writing and archaeology projects on the go, including a YA novel for my creative writing PhD, and I’ve almost finished the sequel to Lightning Tracks, which I’m aiming to release in mid-2019. There will be three books in the Song Gate series, with an undecided fourth. So stay tuned!

You can check out my thoughts on Lightning Tracks, here, and you can purchase it from following links: Amazon | B&N Nook | iBooks  |  kobo

 

About the author

A. A. Kinsela is a pseudonym for Alethea Kinsela

I’m a writer/teacher/archaeologist/jack-of-all-trades. My latest book Lightning Tracks is a dark YA alternative history/fantasy novel set in Australia. You can read an extract on my website. I’ve also got a little educational textbook about Australian archaeology, Ancient Australia Unearthed.

I’m halfway through a Creative Writing PhD, and I sometimes teach in the School of Education at La Trobe University and host writing and archaeology workshops for kids and teachers.

Find Thea on:  goodreads  |  twitter   |  instagram

Review: Lightning Tracks by A. A. Kinsela

Lightning Tracks (Song Gate #1) by A.A. Kinsela

The rider angled the blade so Nick could see the oily residue on the metal.

‘All that’s needed to kill you, boy, is a single cut. A scratch. The poison will do the rest.’ His mask shifted, and Nick could’ve sworn he was smiling. ‘But that wouldn’t be any fun, would it?’

Nick gulped. ‘Why are you doing this?’

The rider leaned closer and hissed, ‘Because you exist.’

Nick isn’t a warrior. He knows some basic karate, but that’s it.

So when an assassin turns up to settle a blood debt, Nick narrowly escapes with his life. In his haste, he unwittingly flees to Korelios, a place he thought existed only in his eccentric aunt’s ancient legends.

All too soon, he finds himself caught in the middle of a war, and he must make an impossible choice: do his duty or follow his heart.

His choice will decide the fate of an entire civilisation.

Published 1 November 2018 |  Publisher: Plainspeak Publishing  |  RRP: AUD$4.99 (ebook) 

Buy Links: Amazon | B&N Nook | iBooks  |  kobo  

My Blurb (3.5 / 5 stars)

I was approached by the author with a review request and I was very intrigued by the (loose) premise: “What if the Roman Empire had made it all the way to Australia?” The book basically is set in the present times, as such, if the Roman Empire made it to Australia. Such a fascinating proposition! What do you think Australia would be like if the Roman Empire conquered Australia at the height of its power?

Lightning Tracks also contained one of my favourite tropes, world within a world; specifically a gateway from our present-times Australia to another world (albeit hidden) where Empires rule over the world. There isn’t a Roman Empire as such, in fact, all the empires and/or races in the story are made up though loosely based on Romans, Greek, etc. I thought there was also an Indigenous spin but it appears I was wrong (see tomorrow’s Q&A post with the author).

The novel opens with Nick getting into trouble at school on his sixteenth birthday. When he got home that day, he found himself fighting for his life and having to flee, found himself in a part of Australia he didn’t know existed but yet some things felt familiar. A very exciting start to the story, for sure! Nick has to quickly find out all he can about this world and his position in it as there is a war brewing; hostilities escalating on both sides and atrocities abound.

There is actually a second perspective to this story, Cal, a highlander boy kidnapped to be a soldier of the Empire. He has been very obedient so far (even in committing a most atrocious act) due to the threat to his family’s lives but event transpired which had him running for his life. For both Cal & Nick, the answer lies in the city Auremos, the rebellion centre of strength.

I liked both characters & perspectives. Nick, a troublesome teen, is not actually aggressive but is rather thoughtful & kind. He’s got a temper which he has to learn to control. Cal, on the other hand, has been trained to be calculated in his moves and he kicks ass!

Lightning Tracks takes the readers on an adventure in Australia’s hidden depth. However, it reads more like a fantasy novel with a couple jarring mentions of Australia. With betrayals, tragedies, secrets, and battles, Lightning Tracks is an exciting & fascinating read for all teens especially for those who feel they are different (like Nick).

Thanks to the author, A.A. Kinsella, for copy of book in exchange of honest review. 

About the author

A. A. Kinsela is a pseudonym for Alethea Kinsela

I’m a writer/teacher/archaeologist/jack-of-all-trades. My latest book Lightning Tracks is a dark YA alternative history/fantasy novel set in Australia. You can read an extract on my website. I’ve also got a little educational textbook about Australian archaeology, Ancient Australia Unearthed.

I’m halfway through a Creative Writing PhD, and I sometimes teach in the School of Education at La Trobe University and host writing and archaeology workshops for kids and teachers.

Find Thea on:  goodreads  |  twitter   |  instagram

Blog Tour: Wind Rider by P.C. Cast -a Review

Wind Rider (Tales of a New World #3) by P.C. Cast

The third novel in the compelling ‘Tales of a New World’ series by New York Times bestselling author P. C. Cast.

Mari, Nik, and their newly formed Pack are being hunted. Thaddeus and the God of Death will stop at nothing until they are obliterated from the earth. But Mari and Nik have one goal: to reach the plains of the Wind Riders in order to band together to stop Thaddeus from destroying all that Mari and Nik hold dear.

But will the mysterious Wind Riders accept the Pack, or will Mari and Nik and their people be rejected by the mighty Riders and be forced to flee for their lives? And what happens when a rogue Lead Stallion gets too close to the Pack, rejecting all Wind Riders and turning to a stranger for companionship instead?

‘While many fantasy series style themselves as epic, this one may actually be worthy of the description.’ School Library Journal

‘Cast … easily engages the readers and keeps them wanting more … a wild journey of power, unlikely relationships, betrayal and acceptance.’ Gold Coast Bulletin

Published 30 October 2018 |  Publisher: Pan Australia  |  RRP: AUD$18.99

My Blurb (3.5 / 5 stars)

Please note this is a review of book 3 of Tales of a New World trilogy, click here for Moon Chosen’s (book 1) review or here for Sun Warrior’s (book 2) review.

Wind Rider follows on directly from the ending of Sun Warrior and if you’ve been following the tale, you’d know exactly where they are going. The tile also kinda gave that away! The first chapter of this book, however, did not open with the Pack but rather introduced a very interesting new perspective; River -daughter of a Wind Rider. Every few chapters, there is a chapter about River and I absolutely adored her adventures!

Nik & Mari and their Pack continued their journey to find a new home they can settle into. As they travel through dangerous territories, led by Antreas and Bast, the Pack bonded through working together and helping each other as they struggle through the unfamiliar and threatening surroundings. I did feel that these chapters dragged a bit. It just took them forever and a day to reach their destinations. Whilst their adventures could be an exciting read, I felt there was something forced and therefore, a bit awkward. There were bits where Mari felt proud of her Pack of one thing or another (it happened multiple times) and while I understood the need to highlight just how well the Pack is getting along, I feel like the author needed to justify the direction Mari has taken?!

Death had established himself in the Tribe of Trees. We read his terrible deeds through the perspective of Ralina, a Storyteller of the Tribe of Trees. Death kept her close at hand as he wished his godly feats to be told in stories through time. I found Ralina to be most admirable character. She chose to stay to help the her people and her strength, courage, and canniness will ensure that the world will hear of how the horrific destruction Death swept throughout the lands.

I have definitely enjoyed the secondary perspectives a lot more. They didn’t give me the awkward feeling Mari’s did. I’d like to read more about them & their struggles. Plus all romances that sprung all around were rather cute! I want to read about those too.

It was strange that the end of this book did NOT actually complete the story. Despite the note, “third novel in the compelling ‘Tales of a New World’ trilogy“, which should mean that this is the finale, the story definitely did NOT end. Without giving too much away, I don’t believe the climax has yet been reached so I’m confused. Are we expecting a spin-off trilogy or something? I don’t know… so, it’s rather unsatisfying since I expected a well-rounded finish to this tale and I do want to finish this tale so I hope for at least another book to be coming soon.

[Edited: I’ve just been informed this ‘trilogy’ is now actually a quartet. So there is one more book to look forward to!]

Thanks to Pan Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review. 

About the author

PC was born in the Midwest, and, after her tour in the USAF, she taught high school for 15 years before retiring to write full time. PC is a member of the Oklahoma Writers Hall of Fame. Her novels have been awarded the prestigious: Oklahoma Book Award, YALSA Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers, Romantic Times Reviewers’ Choice Award, Booksellers’ Best, and many, many more. Ms. Cast is an experienced teacher and talented speaker who lives in Oregon near her fabulous daughter, her adorable pack of dogs, her crazy Maine Coon, and a bunch of horses.

Find Christine on:  goodreads  |  website  | twitter  |  facebook  | instagram

Review: Sun Warrior by P.C. Cast

Sun Warrior (Tales of a New World #2) by P.C. Cast

The second novel in the epic ‘Tales of a New World’ trilogy by New York Times bestselling author P.C. Cast.

The battle lines have been drawn.

Once from rival clans, Mari, an Earth Walker, and Nik, a Companion, now find themselves fighting to save each other and their people from destruction.

Thaddeus has betrayed his own people, killing Nik’s father and destroying their entire clan. But he wants more. He wants the power he believes Mari has stolen from him and his people, and he will do anything to get it back, even if it means destroying everything in his path. There is only one way to stop Thaddeus, and it means a harrowing journey for Mari and Nik into the heart of darkness.

“P.C. Cast builds an engaging world and cleverly smudges the line between fantasy and speculative fiction . . . the world and the slowly rising tension of the story are spooky, compelling and fun.” Good Reading

Published 30 October 2017 |  Publisher: Pan Australia  |  RRP: AUD$18.99

My Blurb (3.5 / 5 stars)

Please note this is a review of book 2 of Tales of a New World trilogy, click here for Moon Chosen’s (book 1) review, 

This book made me totally heartsick. I was heartsick for my pug who died a few years ago. We’ve yet to adopt a new dog though we have been talking it over a lot this year. But it would have been perfect to have a four-legged companion or two to cuddle while reading this book.

Sun Warrior picked up immediately after the end of Moon Chosen (book 1) and we found Nik & Mari escaping from the fire & chaos. Without giving too much away, a lot of bad things have happened near the end of book 1 which made it impossible for Nik & Mari to live peacefully in this area. This big book expanded on the consequences of the previous bad things and add to that the even more big bad awful things that are about to unfold in book 3, Sun Warrior. Unfortunately, it does feel like a filler book where a lot has happened but nothing really happen…

There were certain choices made in this book which I questioned and hoped they’d be explained in the next book. I found it also a little strange and maybe even irksome that all the power seem to be in Mari. I keep hoping something to happen to Nik but errr, he just seems hopeless?! I get the matriarchal society and equality etc etc etc but all the power appears to be Mari’s… I am glad that I waited to read this book because it raises a lot of questions I’m hoping to be answered very soon.

Whilst this trilogy is mostly told from Nik’s & Mari’s POVs, there are a few other minor POVs just so we know what’s happening in other locations. I actually found these characters to be a lot more interesting! Maybe cuz they sounded a little crazy from my point of view; they are what this story dark.

I have mostly enjoyed Sun Warrior though it’s a rather long read and I wished I had a dog I could cuddle up with (especially when any of the four-legged companions were hurt!). It wasn’t a hard read but did feel a little like a filler, an in between book. Hopefully, book 3, Wind Rider, will fulfil all promises made in Sun Warrior.

Thanks to Pan Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review. 

About the author

PC was born in the Midwest, and, after her tour in the USAF, she taught high school for 15 years before retiring to write full time. PC is a member of the Oklahoma Writers Hall of Fame. Her novels have been awarded the prestigious: Oklahoma Book Award, YALSA Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers, Romantic Times Reviewers’ Choice Award, Booksellers’ Best, and many, many more. Ms. Cast is an experienced teacher and talented speaker who lives in Oregon near her fabulous daughter, her adorable pack of dogs, her crazy Maine Coon, and a bunch of horses.

Find Christine on:  goodreads  |  website  | twitter  |  facebook  | instagram

Review: All Fall Down by Ellie Marney

All Fall Down (Circus Hearts #2) by Ellie Marney

A ringmaster’s daughter and a bearded lady’s son join forces to stop a saboteur…

Nineteen-year-old Fleur Klatsch is loyal to her trapeze team and her ringmaster father, dedicated to the circus, and tough on everyone around her. After a series of accidents at Klatsch’s Karnival, Fleur is left holding the ball: she’s running the carnival, trying to stop a saboteur, and taking care of her dad. She doesn’t need anyone’s help, least of all Eugenia Deloren’s son, Marco, who’s been trying to break out of show life since the moment he was born into it. All Marco needs to do is get Klatsch’s back on its feet so he can leave. But after one fateful kiss with Fleur, will he really want to? And will Fleur and Marco figure out who’s trying to kill the show before someone kills them…

Dark YA romance, with a criminal twist – Circus Hearts: Step. Right. Up.

Published 1 October 2018 |  Publisher: Bearded Lady Press  |  RRP: AUD$4.99 (ebook only)

Buy Links: Amazon AU | A&R  | B&N Nook | iBooks  |  kobo  | Mondadori | !ndigo 

My Blurb (4 / 5 stars)

Personally, I don’t like it with series which has different MCs for each serial book. I think mostly because sometimes, it portrays the earlier character that you love in an unlikable light. Or sometimes, like the case here, because the protagonist in this book was so very much UNlikable in the first book. I truly wondered if I was going to be pulling my hair out reading this book.

I’m glad to say that there was no hair-pulling head-banging moments at all. I loved how Fleur recognised her mistake (and we’ve all made stupid mistakes at one point or another) and didn’t run away. And when push comes to shove, she pulled out all the stops to make sure things happen.

Once upon a time, Marco and Fleur were inseparable until the day Marco left to find a steady home-life. He returned to help when Fleur’s dad was injured in a sabotage incident. While Fleur is still angry at him for leaving, she recognise that he’s making her feel everything she’s never felt for any boys before. But will she risk all for someone who’ll be leaving her again soon?

I liked the mystery better in this one as there is actually one. I think my problem with this series is that the books are just too short! I’d love a couple extra more twists in these stories. I am very much looking forward to book 3!! I was disappointed that Ren was mostly missing in this instalment but can’t wait to read about her next.

All Fall Down is a story of redemption; of trust and loyalty. The characters in this book is a little bit older (19+) so again I’d say this borders on New Adult though there is limited sexual content (lots of smooching, peeps, relax!). Sometimes, I find New Adult books to be too much so if you’re looking for a clean-ish sort of New Adult book, I’d highly recommend this one.

Thanks to the author, Ellie Marney, for copy of book in exchange of honest review. 

About the author

Ellie Marney is a teacher and YA author of the Every series (Every BreathEvery WordEvery Move), a highly-awarded crime trilogy for Young Adults – in 2015, Every Breath was named by the Australian Library Information Association as one of the top ten most-borrowed YA books in Australian libraries. Ellie has helped spearhead a collaborative group of literary sector professionals under the banner ‘#LoveOzYA’ to advocate for and promote Australian YA literature. She is one of the contributors to Begin End Begin: A #LoveOzYA Anthology, and she hosts a book club – ‘#LoveOzYAbookclub’ – online. She is an Ambassador for the Stella Prize Schools Program, and is a regular speaker at schools, events and festivals. In 2017, Ellie released No Limits, a companion novel to the series – her latest novel is White Night.

Ellie was born in Brisbane, and has lived in Indonesia, Singapore and India. Now she writes, teaches, talks about YA literature, and gardens when she can, while living in a country idyll (actually a very messy wooden house on ten acres with a dog and lots of chickens) near Castlemaine, in north-central Victoria. Her partner and four sons still love her, even though she often forgets things and lets the housework go.

Find Ellie on:  goodreads  |  website  | twitter  |  facebook  | instagram | pinterest