Tag Archives: children

Review: Paper Planes

paper planesPaper Planes by Steve Worland
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Source: paperback copy courtesy of publisher

Most readers would be keen to read a book before seeing the movie and usually, I’m quite particular about it too. However, seeing that this is rather movie to book, I’d opted to watch it first before reading. I really enjoyed the movie (especially, at the end, when I caught hubby trying to hide a tear or two he is not going to live this one down, lol). It was a fun movie with excellent casting.

As the book is adapted from the movie, it’s no surprise that it’s faithful to the movie. All through the reading, I have a vivid memory of the scenes from the movie. I really can’t complain having David Wenham & Sam Worthington in my head 😉 Reading it as adult though, you really need to suspend your scepticism and just allow yourself to dream the impossible. Let yourself to be beguiled by Dylan’s hopes and follow his journey to get his father back.

The language is quite simple and definitely aimed at children. I would recommend readers from year 3 onwards though only if your child is an advanced reader in year 3. There were a lot of Aussie slang noting that this was mostly set in a small Aussie town. If you could read together with your child then I’d suggest you do so as there can be quite a number of good discussions ranging from bereavement, grief, bullying, etc. Unfortunately, the issues aren’t dealt in depth or at least, not as in-depth as I’d like it to be. Therefore, it is mostly a fun read but your discussions could be as deep as you like by your guidance as parents / teachers.

Thanks to Penguin Books Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review

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Review: The Dagger in the Desk

the dagger in the deskThe Dagger in the Desk by Jonathan Stroud
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Source: eARC courtesy of publisher

I’m not usually one who reads short stories that are in between series. I got overexcited when I saw this title on NetGalley and automatically, requested it as I thought it to be the 3rd book. In any case, I still read it and it was still a very fun read.

This li’l book basically is about a case taken on by Lockwood & Co. It is basically an adventure/horror tale with a moral lesson. If you’re after something fun to read to squeeze in whilst waiting for the doctor or during lunchtime, this is a good one to pick up as it really doesn’t require too much brain power but will amuse greatly. If you’ve not read the series yet, you could read this as a sample that’s still a full story with an ending. If you’ve read the series, you don’t really have to pick this up as it doesn’t have any bearing on the continuity of the series.

I just wish, though, that if Stroud is writing a short story that there’d be an #0.5 –a story about Anthony Lockwood or about Lockwood & Cubbins Before Lucy.

Thank you, RHCP Digital for copy of eARC via NetGalley

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Review: The Whispering Skull

the whispering skullThe Whispering Skull by Jonathan Stroud
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Source: eARC courtesy of publisher

I read the first book of Lockwood & Co. at the beginning of this year and was completely enamoured with the whole setup. Whilst I first started with the thought of finding out what’s available in the children’s sections these days (my son is starting school next year, eep!); I truly completely loved The Screaming Staircase that I didn’t hesitate to request The Whispering Skull when I saw it on NetGalley. I enjoyed the company of Lockwood & Co. even more this time around.

The book opens with a creepy scene with action quickly following on its heel; an investigation of Lockwood & Co. that didn’t quite turn out as they wished. This was such a terrific and most engaging start. It also promises a more sinister tone to this book than the first instalment. A promised well-fulfilled, if I may say so. The Whispering Skull gives us scary situations, frightening creatures, & spine-chilling items that threatened the well-being of the whole world.

What I mostly loved about this book, however, is the development of characters, not only of Lockwood, George, and Lucy but also of Kipps & co. I loved how Kipps is (whilst being the most annoying nemesis) ‘humanised’ and all are called to sympathise with him. I also loved the development of friendship between Lockwood, George, & Lucy – that there’s ups and downs in friendships & that trust is a requisite in a well-oiled relationships.

I cannot recommend this book highly enough to all children and parents out there looking for an adventure. You will love the characters and be thrilled by the plot. Girls & Boys, get into it!

Thank you, Disney-Hyperion, for copy of eARC via NetGalley

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Review: Seven Little Australians

Seven Little Australians
Seven Little Australians by Ethel Turner
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Source: Own a copy -get your own copy from The Book Depository OR a free electronic version from Project Gutenberg

I think I would have enjoyed this story a lot more if I read this at a much younger age. This is, of course, one of those classic books that everyone (or at least most Aussies) would have read in school that I have missed out on, being an immigrant. But I am catching up!

It was an easy story to read and enjoy on a fine weekend. In between, we went to a birthday picnic where children were indulged in sugar-y goodness and lots of play in the sun. So, I had the same sort of image in my head when I was reading this book. But… I have to say that those children were pretty tame in comparison to what these “Seven Little Australians” get up to!

The book was evenly spread out between all children; what they are like, why they are so, their own brand of mischiefs but all imbued with their own innate goodness. There were some shocking things that they do but as a reader, you can’t help but laugh –although, if my child did any of those things, I would’ve been so… angry and disappointed. The ending was really unexpected but I would love to continue and follow their stories.

Not one of the seven is really good, for the very excellent reason that Australian children never are…. But in Australia a model child is – I say it not without thankfulness – an unknown quantity. It may be that the miasmas of naughtiness develop best in the sunny brilliancy of our atmosphere. It may be that the land and the people are young-hearted together,… There is a lurking sparkle of joyousness and rebellion and mischief in the nature here, and therefore in children.

If you enjoyed children classics such as What Katy Did / What Katy Did at School or even Little Women, I believe you may enjoy this tale too.

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