Category Archives: crime

Review: Sticks and Stones by Katherine Firkin

Sticks and Stones by Katherine Firkin

A terrifying, twisting debut from TV news journalist Katherine Firkin. It’s time for a killer to leave his mark . . .

It’s winter in Melbourne and Detective Emmett Corban is starting to regret his promotion to head of the Missing Persons Unit, as the routine reports pile up on his desk.

So when Natale Gibson goes missing, he’s convinced this is the big case he’s been waiting for – the woman’s husband and parents insist the devoted mother would never abandon her children, and her personal accounts remain untouched.

But things aren’t all they seem. The close-knit Italian family is keeping secrets – none bigger than the one Natale has been hiding.

Just as the net seems to be tightening, the investigation is turned on its head. The body of a woman is found . . . then another.

What had seemed like a standard missing person’s case has turned into a frightening hunt for a serial killer, and time is running out.

But to really understand these shocking crimes, Emmett and his team will need to delve back through decades of neglect – back to a squalid inner-city flat, where a young boy is left huddling over his mother’s body . . .

Published 2 June 2020 |  Publisher: Penguin Random House Australia  |  RRP: AUD$32.99

Buy it at: Dymocks |  Booktopia |  A&R  |  Abbey’s  | QBD

My Blurb (4 / 5 stars)

Firstly, I am hoping that this is going to turn out to be a first in a series because it’s got some good premises and am keen to follow Detective Emmett Corban’s career and a more developed characters of his colleagues.

I am one of those who does not look / read the book description just before I read the book. The fact that I’ve, earlier, chosen to read it should suffice, so I sort of dived in without knowing / remembering much. The first chapter sort of confused me a little as there are so many characters introduced already and I didn’t know if I could keep track of who’s who. A couple of chapters on, I got used to the structure of chapters and just flew through the book. Retrospectively, I read the book description and behold, I could have saved my earlier confusion if I read it first lol

As we jump quite quickly from one scene to another with different characters, I thought the author has done quite well in keeping my attention and not getting me confused at all. It was quite good being able to get near 360-degree view of the ‘case’ and it got me to wonder how each character was going to be implicated in the case, the next victim or the murderer or just a red herring. I kept changing my opinion from one chapter to another on who the murderer was! The only think I’m missing is backgrounds on the detectives as we don’t seem to hear very much of them & their past.

Sticks and Stones is a fast-paced thrilling crime novel that will get you to flick pages without noticing the time. A great riveting read to cuddle with this winter!

Thanks to Penguin Random House Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review

About the author

Katherine Firkin is a Melbourne journalist, currently with CBS New York.

She has over a decade of experience and has worked across every medium – print, online, television and radio.

Katherine began her career at the Herald Sun newspaper (News Corp), where she specialised in sports reporting (winning an AFL Media award in 2008), before moving to breaking news, including crime and court reporting. During this time, she covered some of Victoria’s most notorious criminal affairs, including the death and funeral of underworld figure Carl Williams.

She has also worked for Seven West Media (7 News, 7 Sport), 3AW Radio, the Nine Network’s Today show, and Network Ten, and has been a regular international correspondent for multiple global outlets.

Katherine has been writing fiction from a young age, and she studied literature and journalism at university. Her debut novel is inspired by the many criminal trials she has covered.

Find author on:  goodreads  |  website  |  twitter  |  instagram

Review: Find Them Dead by Peter James

Find Them Dead (Roy Grace #16) by Peter James

Roy Grace, creation of the award-winning author Peter James, unearths a powerful criminal network in Find Them Dead.

A Brighton gangster is on trial for conspiracy to murder, following the death of a rival crime family boss. As the jury file into Lewes Crown Court, twelve anonymous people selected randomly from fifty, there is one person sitting in the public gallery observing them with keen interest, and secretly filming them. Later, a group of the accused’s henchmen sit around a table with the full personal details of each of the twelve jurors in front of them. They need to influence two of them – a jury can convict if directed on a 10-2 majority verdict but no less. But which two?

When Roy Grace is called in to investigate a murder that has links to the accused and the trial, and the suspicion that an attempt has been made to intimidate jurors, he finds the reach and power of the accused’s tentacles go higher than he had ever imagined.

Published 12 May 2020 |  Publisher: Pan MacMillan Australia  |  RRP: AUD$32.99

Buy it at: Dymocks |  Booktopia |  A&R  |  Abbey’s  | QBD

My Blurb (3.5 / 5 stars)

I received this book as an unsolicited review copy. While I’m familiar with the author’s name, I’ve not read any of his books. I was sort of excited to try as I do love my crime novels until… I found out that this book is 16th(!!) in a series. I’m not keen to read a book in the middle of a series but thought I’m going to break out of my mould and read out of sequence!! To be fair, I did listen to books 2 & 3 (all I could managed) before reading this 16th book.

Soooo, could you read this without having read previous books? I’m leaning towards yes because even as you miss a lot (and I do mean Heaps!) of backstories, serial crime novels would usually stand alone. I wouldn’t really recommend reading it out of sequence though as I do wonder at certain things Roy Grace is facing and how that came about. However, this isn’t actually a huge part of the book. And that’s another thing, this book is nearly double the size of the first few in the series…??!!

I found the book to be slightly off from my expectation of a serial police procedural crime novels. The first being that about 80% of the book reads like a legal thriller and in addition to that, Roy Grace and his team barely featured in that part of the book. It nearly felt like reading 2 separate books?! The second thing I thought a bit weird was that I didn’t feel like there was much investigating happening; barely any action from the policing team. And this linked back to my first issue about the book being a legal thriller than a police procedural I expected it to be.

From the legal thriller part of the book, the story is told from the perspective of a juror being nobbled. As legal thrillers go (I went through a John Grisham phase years ago), I thought the suspense was excellent. Hence, my more positive rating of the book even as I wondered whether the series fan will love it or not. For now, I’m happy to leave off the series but who knows, maybe I’ll pick one up one day just because…

Thanks to Pan MacMillan Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review

About the author

Peter James is a UK number one bestselling author, best known for writing crime and thriller novels, and the creator of the much-loved Detective Superintendent Roy Grace. Globally, his books have been translated into thirty-seven languages.

Synonymous with plot-twisting page-turners, Peter has garnered an army of loyal fans throughout his storytelling career – which also included stints writing for TV and producing films. He has won over forty awards for his work, including the WHSmith Best Crime Author of All Time Award, Crime Writers’ Association Diamond Dagger and a BAFTA nomination for The Merchant of Venice starring Al Pacino and Jeremy Irons for which he was an Executive Producer. Many of Peter’s novels have been adapted for film, TV and stage.

Find author on:  goodreads  |  website  |  facebook  |  twitter  |  instagram  |  youtube

Review: The Dry by Jane Harper

The Dry (Aaron Falk #1) by Jane Harper

WHO REALLY KILLED THE HADLER FAMILY?

It hasn’t rained in Kiewarra for two years. Tensions in the farming community become unbearable when three members of the Hadler family are discovered shot to death on their property. Everyone assumes Luke Hadler committed suicide after slaughtering his wife and six-year-old son.

Federal Police investigator Aaron Falk returns to his hometown for the funerals and is unwillingly drawn into the investigation. As suspicion spreads through the town, Falk is forced to confront the community that rejected him twenty years earlier. Because Falk and his childhood friend Luke Hadler shared a secret, one which Luke’s death threatens to unearth…

Published 28 February 2017 |  Publisher: Pan Australia  |  RRP: AUD$16.99

Buy it at: Dymocks |  Booktopia |  A&R |  QBD  | Abbey’s

My Blurb (4 / 5 stars)

Red herrings right for the very beginning! They coloured the characters’ perspectives and therefore, the readers’. I absolutely could not pick out who until it all became very obvious. The Dry is an immersive crime novel set in outback Australia. The drought was killing off the environment, animals, and businesses but was it such that it factors in this horrific murder-suicide?

Aaron Falk, a Federal Agent, ran away from this town 20 years ago under a cloud of suspicion from the death of a friend. He has returned for the funeral of another friend and found himself agreeing to “look into” things. However, the past will not leave him be… Is this present case connected to the past?

The novel is told from Falk’s perspective in the present but in between, there are paragraphs (in italics) where the past intrudes whether it be Falk’s perspective or others. As always, the past never seems to be as you remember it to be and always refused to be left behind.

What really got to me in this novel is Falk’s realisation of just what ‘drought’ really means;

“His own naivety taunted him like a flicker of madness. How could he have imagined fresh water still ran by these farms as animals lay dead in the paddocks? How could he nod dumbly as the word drought was thrown around, and never realise this river ran dry?”

I bought this paperback copy for my own reading pleasure

About the author

Jane Harper is the international bestselling author of The Dry, Force of Nature and The Lost Man. Jane is a New York Times and Sunday Times bestseller, and has won numerous top awards including the Australian Book Industry Awards Book of the Year, the Australian Indie Awards Book of the Year, the CWA Gold Dagger Award for Best Crime Novel, and the British Book Awards Crime and Thriller Book of the Year. Her books are published in more than 36 territories worldwide, with The Dry in production as a major motion picture starring Eric Bana. Jane worked as a print journalist for thirteen years both in Australia and the UK, and now lives in Melbourne.

Find Jane on:  goodreads  |   twitter  |  facebook  |  instagram  | website

Review: River of Salt by Dave Warner

River of Salt by Dave Warner

1961, Philadelphia. After having to give up his brother to save his own life, hitman Blake Saunders flees the Mob and seeks refuge on the other side of the world. Two years later he has been reborn in a tiny coastal Australian town. The ghosts of the past still haunt him but otherwise Coral Shoals is
paradise. Blake surfs, and plays guitar in his own bar, the Surf Shack. But then the body of a young woman is found at a local motel, and evidence links her the Surf Shack. When Blake’s friend is arrested, and the local sergeant doesn’t want to know, it becomes clear to Blake – who knows a thing or two about murder – that the only way to protect his paradise is to
find the killer.

Published 1 April 2019 |  Publisher: Fremantle Press |  RRP: AUD$29.99

My Blurb (3 / 5 stars)

So some GR friends were very excited about having access this as ‘Read Now’ on Netgalley and it was so contagious, I caught it. For some reason though, the words (in the description) ‘reborn’ and ‘ghosts’ made me expect something supernatural?! I don’t really know what my frame of mind was like at that time but my head was definitely not screwed on properly because there’s really nothing supernatural here…

Of course, incorrect expectations didn’t help because whatever I expected never happened and that can let to a disappointment. I’m afraid that even after I read other reviews, I still couldn’t get rid of my original thought. Unfortunately, I’m not a big fan of noir so River of Salt turned out to be just an okay read for me.

I enjoyed the first chapter a lot as it really gave form to the character of Blake Saunders. This is not a novel about the mafia though so he needed to be ‘reborn’ and what better place that some little coastal Aussie town. But even in an out-of-the-way sort of place, there is no avoiding bad things and as Blake tried to get it all sorted, things just kept escalating ’til he came across a ‘ghost’ from his past.

I love the setting (and said descriptions) and secondary characters (especially of the female variety). I’d love to live in a town like that – sounds divine – but I really would not like to live in the 60s as a woman. The mystery itself was astonishing, the climax heartpounding, and the ending, I think this could be a series 😉

Thanks to Fremantle Press via Netgalley for ecopy of book in exchange of honest review

About the author

Dave Warner is an author, musician and

screenwriter. He originally came to national
prominence with his gold album Mug’s Game, and
his band Dave Warner’s from the Suburbs. In 2017
he released his tenth album When. He has been
named a Western Australian State Living Treasure
and has been inducted into the WAMi Rock’n’Roll
of Renown.

Find Dave on:  goodreads  |  website  | twitter  |  facebook

Review: Gone by Midnight by Candice Fox


Gone by Midnight (Crimson Lake #3) by Candice Fox

Crimson Lake is where bad people come to disappear – and where eight-year-old boys vanish into thin air . . .

On the fifth floor of the White Caps Hotel, four young friends are left alone while their parents dine downstairs. But when Sara Farrow checks on the children at midnight, her son is missing. The boys swear they stayed in their room, and CCTV confirms Richie has not left the building. Despite a thorough search, no trace of the child is found.

Distrustful of the police, Sara turns to Crimson Lake’s unlikeliest private investigators: disgraced cop Ted Conkaffey and convicted killer Amanda Pharrell. This case just the sort of twisted puzzle that gets Amanda’s blood pumping.

For Ted, the case couldn’t have come at a worse time. Two years ago a false accusation robbed him of his career, his reputation and most importantly his family. But now Lillian, the daughter he barely knows, is coming to stay in his ramshackle cottage by the lake.

Ted must dredge up the area’s worst characters to find a missing boy. And the kind of danger he uncovers could well put his own child in deadly peril . . .

Published 22 January 2019 |  Publisher: Penguin Books Australia  |  RRP: AUD$32.99

My Blurb (5 / 5 stars)

This review is in relation to book 3 of the series and I have done my best to avoid any spoilers. If you wish, you may read my review on books 1 & 2: here & here

Wow! I sincerely hope that Candice Fox never stops writing. She has a recognisable unique voice and I just love it! It’s snappy. And kooky. And snort-out-loud-hilarious. I love her characters; their pains & fears, vulnerabilities & courage, their humanity amidst evil. The plot & structure all very neatly tied up and as always, explosive snappy endings.

I still can’t get my head around Amanda Pharrell. She’s just as loud, in-your-face, and unpredictable as she ever was. This is just what I love; being taken on by surprise by an author because this is a rare thing for me, tbh. On the other hand, Ted Conkaffey is healing and shaping up to be more human; his fatherhood and his hopes & dreams are starting to pull him out of the crushing weight of his misery.

A tense beginning punctured by Amanda’s brassy entrance (I adored this scene!) followed by deft weaving of plot threads with touches of comic reliefs made Gone by Midnight a finely tuned suspense read.  I can’t wait for the next instalment which promises to be most explosive of the series so far. Oh, and it’s Not Candice Fox’s Crimson Lake if there is no crocodiles; crocs abound!

I would not recommend you to read this book before the other 2 because you’ll miss a lot of background and also because, there were some repercussions in this book from the ending of book 2. So, if you haven’t read this series yet, Chop! Chop! Don’t miss out on a cracking crime series!

Thanks to Penguin Books Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review

About the author

Hades, Candice Fox’s first novel, won the Ned Kelly Award for best debut in 2014 from the Australian Crime Writers Association. The sequel, Eden, won the Ned Kelly Award for best crime novel in 2015, making Candice only the second author to win these accolades back to back. All her subsequent novels – Fall, Crimson Lake and Redemption Point – have been shortlisted for the Ned Kelly Award. Her new novel, Gone by Midnight, will publish in January 2019.

In 2015 Candice began collaborating with James Patterson. Their first novel together, Never Never, set in the vast Australian outback, was a huge bestseller in Australia and went straight to number 1 on the New York Times bestseller list in the US and also to the top of the charts in the UK. Its sequel, Fifty Fifty, was released in 2017 and their third collaboration, Liar Liar, in August 2018. They have also co-written a prequel novella, Black & Blue, as part of the James Patterson BookShots series.

Bankstown born and bred, Candice lives in Sydney.

Find Candice on:  goodreads  |  website  | twitter  |  facebook  | instagram

Review: The Girl Without Skin by Mads Peder Nordbo

The Girl Without Skin (Grønland – Greenland #1) by Mads Peder Nordbo

They were near the edge of the glacier. The sea beneath the helicopter was dense with pack ice. In front of them, the endless whiteness stretched as far as the light could reach. It hurt his eyes. Millions of white crystals. Except in one place. One spot. Right where the mummified Norseman had been found and Aqqalu had kept watch. There, the ice was glossy red.

When a mummified Viking corpse is discovered in a crevasse out on the edge of an ice sheet, journalist Matthew Cave is sent to cover the story. The next day the mummy is gone, and the body of the policeman who was keeping watch is found naked and flayed—exactly like the victims in a gruesome series of murders that terrified the remote town of Nuuk in the 1970s.

As Matt investigates, he is shocked by the deprivation and brutal violence the locals take for granted. Unable to trust the police, he begins to suspect a cover-up. It’s only when he meets a young Inuit woman, Tupaarnaq, convicted of killing her parents and two small sisters, that Matt starts to realise how deep this story goes—and how much danger he is in.

Text Publishing |  1 October 2018  |  AUD$29.99

My Blurb (3/5 stars)

I’ve watched pretty much all the Nordic crime shows on Netflix which is one reason I’m interested in this book. The title itself, The Girl Without Skin, is intriguing despite the promised gruesomeness. But I’m still not quite sure how this title work… it’s definitely not a literal meaning.

The opening chapter captured my interest easily despite breaking heart. Matthew Cave lost all meaning to his life in one horrific accident. He fled and found himself in Nuuk (Greenland). When a mummified corpse was found, he expected it to be a worldwide breaking news but instead it set off a series of murders that are eerily similar to the one in 1970s.

About 70% of the book is told from Matthew’s perspective in the present time as he followed up clues to crack this mystery. The rest of the book is journal entries by a police officer in the 70s who investigated those murders but then disappeared, leaving this notebook behind. The root of the mystery though is not the murders themselves but something else that is dark and has never yet seen the light.

At roughly halfway through the book Matthew appeared to have gained a sidekick, Tupaarnaq. Though really, I reckon he’s the sidekick in this partnership; Tupaarnaq is one tough chick -hiding a world of hurt. I don’t know if anyone else sees this but she reminds me of Amanda Pharrell from Crimson Lake series (except for Amanda’s unique & quirky sense of humour).  I’d be more interested to hear her perspective.

I very much enjoyed the setting, atmosphere, & cultural differences I found in The Girl Without Skin but overall, I didn’t particularly found the mystery engaging. I wasn’t surprised by any twists and found myself disappointed by how easily the mysteries of Tupaarnaq’s past (um, yes, I Googled on how to pronounce that name!) & Matthew’s father’s disappearance were dismissed. I’d be interested in the sequel though as I’d like to see the development of this partnership.

Thanks to Text Publishing for copy of book in exchange of honest review.

About the author

Mads Peder Nordbo is Danish but has lived in Nuuk for several years. Born in 1970, he hold degrees in Literature, Communications and Philosophy from The University of Southern Denmark and the University of Stockholm. Mads has lived in Denmark, Sweden, Germany and Greenland. He works in communications at the Town Hall in Nuuk, where he amongst other things, writes for the mayor of the municipality, Kommuneqarfik Sermersooq, which stretches across the Greenland ice sheet. Mads Peder Nordbo is the author of three novels. THE GIRL WITHOUT SKIN is his debut as a crime writer.

Find Rebecca on:  website  |  goodreads  |  instagram  | facebook  | twitter

Review: Redemption Point by Candice Fox

Redemption Point (Crimson Lake #2) by Candice Fox

#1 New York Times bestselling author Candice Fox delivers a compulsive new crime thriller, which sees Ted Conkaffey once again teaming up with an unlikely partner – this time the father of the girl he was accused of abducting . . .

When former police detective Ted Conkaffey was wrongly accused of abducting thirteen-year-old Claire Bingley, he hoped the Queensland rainforest town of Crimson Lake would be a good place to disappear. But nowhere is safe from Claire’s devastated father.

Dale Bingley has a brutal revenge plan all worked out  and if Ted doesn’t help find the real abductor, he’ll be its first casualty.

Meanwhile, in a dark roadside hovel called the Barking Frog Inn, the bodies of two young bartenders lie on the beer-sodden floor. It’s Detective Inspector Pip Sweeney’s first homicide investigation – complicated by the arrival of private detective Amanda Pharrell to ‘assist’ on the case. Amanda’s conviction for murder a decade ago has left her with some odd behavioural traits, top-to-toe tatts – and a keen eye for killers.

For Ted and Amanda, the hunt for the truth will draw them into a violent dance with evil. Redemption is certainly on the cards – but it may well cost them their lives . . .

‘Definitely a writer to watch’ Harlan Coben

‘A bright new star of crime fiction’ James Patterson

My Blurb (5 stars)

Wishes do come true! Well… sort of! I wanted more of Ted & Amanda and I also wanted to hear a bit of from Amanda (my wish was in my review for the first book, Crimson Lake, so if you’re reading this, Candice, my thanks x). Redemption Point gave me both though Amanda Pharrell is still just as excruciatingly elusive. Excruciating in the sense that I just couldn’t see how she thinks but she’s just as entertaining and frustrating as ever!

How do you solve a problem like Amanda?
How do you catch a cloud and pin it down?
How do you find a word that means Amanda?
A flibbertijibbet! A will-o’-the wisp! A clown!

In this book, Ted and Amanda spent quite a lot of time on their own so it made sense to have multiple perspectives even though that mean we barely see them interact however there were a couple other perspectives and one of which gave me the willies. It was in the form of diary entries and was, therefore, very intimate and confessional. I was very uncomfortable with this, at the beginning, due to the character’s thoughts but halfway through I could just appreciate the additional thrills and suspense this perspective add to the book.

Ted, despite his best effort to bury himself, was forced to face up to the Claire Bingley’s abduction that he was wrongly accused for. He had resisted looking into the matter but he could no longer shy away. A confrontation with Claire’s father, Dale, combined with Ted’s own generous heart may just come to end the matter once for all… but for whom?

Amanda mostly had to investigate the murders at Barking Frog Inn (don’t you just love this name?!) without Ted though that did not mean she didn’t have any assistance. In the form of Detective Inspector Pip Sweeney who carried her own dark shameful secret. Ted may be missing in action but Amanda & Pip were just as on point. And that ending! Gah! *gagging myself from spoiling everything!*

Aside from amazing characters, I love the vivid descriptions in this novel. It’s one thing to have a vivid imagination but to be able to write them down without boring your reader, that’s skill. I feel and ‘see’ the humid lush isolated Queensland town. I love to live there in my imagination but not IRL lol

Between the houses on the other side of the creek lay thick tangles of rainforest, impenetrable by the eye, walls of crossing vines and elephant ear leaves wet and dripping…

Redemption Point is an amazingly crafted crime thriller. Tension was taut right from the very beginning and it just gets tighter; so strung up that by ending you don’t know whether to cry from heartbreak or relief. These poor characters get no break whatsoever especially Ted. And can I get back to that ending?! Just spectacular… I need book 3 (I’m hoping there is one…).

Thanks to Penguin Books Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review

About the author

Hades, Candice Fox’s first novel, won the Ned Kelly Award for best debut in 2014 from the Australian Crime Writers Association. The sequel, Eden, won the Ned Kelly Award for best crime novel in 2015, making Candice only the second author to win these accolades back to back. Her third novel, Fall, was shortlisted for the 2016 Ned Kelly and Davitt awards. She is also the author of the bestselling Crimson Lake, which introduces a new series character, Ted Conkaffey.

In 2015 Candice began collaborating with James Patterson. Their first novel together, Never Never, set in the vast Australian outback, was a huge bestseller in Australia and went straight to number 1 on the New York Times bestseller list in the US and also to the top of the charts in the UK. Its sequel, Fifty Fifty, was released in August 2017 and she is currently working on their third collaboration. They have also co-written a prequel novella, Black & Blue, as part of the James Patterson BookShots series.

Bankstown born and bred, Candice lives in Sydney.

Find Candice on: goodreads  |  website  | twitter  |  facebook

Review: Crimson Lake

crimson-lakeCrimson Lake by Candice Fox
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I was soooo excited to see Candice Fox was to release a new book. I must admit to being a teeny weeny disappointed to find out that it is NOT an Archer & Bennett but still… It’s a must-read. If you love crime novels, Candice Fox’s books are must-reads!

Despite being told that this is her best book yet, I can NOT make this distinction. I love ALL her books fairly equally and they are ALL my favourites. The mysteries are terrific but the characters and what she made them go through are just mind-boggling. They are fragile. They are broken. They are survivors.

The main difference in Crimson Lake to the Archer & Bennett books to my mind is that it’s cracking hilarious. Wait a minute, Amanda Pharrell is horrendously hilarious. I can see some people might find her annoying and if she’s someone I know IRL, I’d probably want to kill her myself but seriously the stuff she said were Lough Out Loud Funny. Err, yes, I’m most probably that crazy lady on the train… Here’s one of the things she said that cracked me up to no end & I kept going back to it:

“… I’m dead fascinated with your case. I’m so fascinated, someone should pin me in their hair and wear me to the races.”

We don’t know very much how Amanda’s mind works as the novel is told from Ted Conkaffey’s perspective but one thing we do know is that she’s full on contradictions. She’d slunk away for certain confrontations and yet,

“…doesn’t anything scare you anymore?”
“Not really,” she said brightly…

Ted Conkaffey is hiding. He’s tired and he’s sad. He has had no choice but to accept what fate has dealt him to date. The geese found him. Amanda baffled him. Her cases interest his mind and his brain geared up to put these puzzles together. Maybe there is something else he could do even now… Despite being told from Ted’s perspective; Amanda completely took over the whole book. Maybe we’ll have her perspective in the next book?

Aside from these amazing characterisation, I also love Fox’s prose; the way she draws you to the characters then the setting and then weaves tangled weave of mysterious circumstances which leave you guessing ‘til the end. Crimson Lake, with its tightly developed plot, unique characters and a snapping end, is a thoroughly enjoyable read.

Thanks to Penguin Books Australia for copy of book in exchange of honest review

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Review: Fall

fallFall by Candice Fox
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Source: eARC courtesy of publisher

Please note this is a review of Book 3 in Archer & Bennett series and there may be spoilers in respect of earlier books.

Wow-Wee! Candice Fox delivers once again! This series is one that I would gladly re-read again and again. It is THAT good. I’ve rated all 3 five stars as each were unputdownable; I couldn’t wait to find out what’s going to happen next from one page to the next much less from one book to the next. I am hopping from one foot to another in impatience for the next instalment of Archer & Bennett.

Eden ends with a threat hanging over Eden’s secret identity. I was truthfully anxious to find out how this will pan out; I was afraid of what this will mean to Eden’s nocturnal activities, her ‘relationship’ with Bennett, and also afraid for the safety of the person who’s about to blow it all out. And just how did it turn out? Well! You really must read it for yourself since I couldn’t believe what happened & had to read it a few times over before it actually sunk it that she did it… when a few minutes before I was wailing, ‘No… No… Noooo…’

Eden, as the antiheroine, has a void insider her when it comes to empathy. This was highlighted very much in this novel. Bennett, on the other, appears to be a desperate case but there’s a little light of hope for him… What’s happened in this novel though dimmed what little hope there was and I’m not sure exactly whether I’m excited or nervous as I believe we are about to witness the dark-side of Bennett. Or are we?

If you love antiheroines, if you love your crime novels, you MUST read Candice Fox. I highly recommend this series, Archer & Bennett, to everyone. There are baddies and there are baddies. There’s the twist and then there’s THE twist. This series has utterly won my heart and Candice Fox my loyalty.

Thanks Random House Australia for eARC via NetGalley in exchange of honest review

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Review: The Killing Lessons

the killing lessonsThe Killing Lessons by Saul Black
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Source: Uncorrected Proof courtesy of publisher

There seems to be a flood of psychological thrillers these days since Gone Girl. Unfortunately, I am not a fan of that book and so, I feel a little ambivalent towards this genre. In saying that, it still hasn’t stop me reading one or two and I thought this was one. Fortunately, it’s not! And fortunately, I have absolutely enjoyed this reading this book –even if my heart was permanently in my mouth from start to end.

The book began with a chilling scene. It’s a scene which grabbed my attention straight away from the contrast of a nice safe homey feeling (with smells of baking!) to the intrusion of sinister strangers. This is all in one (1) sentence. Yes, the very first sentence! My heart began to race and did not stop until right the very end. The tension of the chase and the pace of the tale was maintained exquisitely throughout the telling.

The Killing Lessons was so much more than the book blurb. It wasn’t just about the little girl who survived nor the detective on the trail of these murderers. There were a number of other perspectives which took a little time to get used to but which I fully appreciated later on. It’s almost like hearing a story from everybody’s points of view so you’d get the full picture of what’s happening.

I could not put this book down. It was an electrifying ride reading from the points of view of victims, murderers, and detectives. I would not hesitate to recommend this book to all thriller lovers and I’ve fallen in love with this author too! I think I might even try his fantasy works 

Thanks to Hachette Australia via The Reading Room for Uncorrected Proof in exchange of honest review

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